Change your focus

For the past few decades, targetting the sellers has been very ineffective in stopping the sale of illegal drugs.

When you arrest the sellers, it only exacerbates the issue.

The fundamental law of economics that controls any market is supply and demand.

Stopping drug sellers decreases supply, making it more scarce, while the demand remains the same, or more often rising due to the scarcity of the drugs. Prices rise, and the sellers who are now in jail are replaced by newcomers who see the potential to make a big profit in the now scarce economy.

People want what is rare, and what is rare is expensive, and people will flock to the money.

If the ultimate goal here is to eliminate illegal drugs in society, perhaps we need to change our focus from targetting sellers to also target buyers. Cutting demand means there is no incentive to sell, and if both sellers and buyers are slowly eliminated together, the whole economy will collapse quicker.

Perhaps the solution to other problems in our life is not the one we have been focusing on.

Change your focus and see if there is a difference

Good Luck.

 

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Alternatives

Anyone who knows me also knows that I have allergies…

A lot of them

Beef, dairy, eggs, yeast, peanuts, sesame, lamb, pineapple, gluten, 1000 different type of trees, pollen, and the cold.

Dairy might be the worst one

Not being able to have milk with my coffee or cereal.

No ice cream, no alfredo sauce, no cookies

No milk with my Oreos…

And somehow dairy ends up in everything that is packaged too

But I’ve been able to find alternatives.

Coconut milk has recently been my favorite

And to be honest, it’s not that bad compared to dairy milk. I even had some coconut yogurt–though it did cost a lot, $6 for one cup!

But I guess my point is this:

I had no idea how I’d be able to even eat food when I found out I was allergic to half of my diet last summer.

Like seriously, I’d been eating these things my whole life, and all of a sudden, I developed allergies to them, or was I always allergic to them?

So then began my path to find alternatives.

Chicken instead of meatballs with my spaghetti

Vegan alternative ice creams and vegan cheese

Coconut milk instead of dairy milk

No beer for me–but it’s not like I really care to drink anyways

Alternatives are everywhere

Villanova was an “alternative” to me

Singapore was an “alternative” option to me when they told me London group was filled

I started diving into performance magic because I failed to make the basketball team

Alternatives are not as bad as we make them out to be.

Because as long as we have options, as long as we have alternative solutions, everything in the end can be okay.

And it might even be better than what you originally wanted.

Good Luck.

Time

Do you ever find it bizarre that time only moves forward, and not backward?

Do you ever wonder why time affects everyone, is constantly moving, but it still feels different to everyone?

Even though 60 ticks on a clock goes by means 1 minute

That 1 minute can feel dragged out

When you are in pain

When you are sad

That 1 minute can feel like an eternity of suffering

Yet, when you are in peace

When you are just able to relax

Talk to a friend

Watch a great TV show

Spend your time listening to music and thinking

Time goes by quickly

Tick

Tock

Tick

Tock

The clock will tick 2,366,820,000 for you

And in the end, that’s still not enough ticks… not really…

So the only thing we can do it to make each of those ticks count

 

A letter to myself

Dear Jeff,

You live a privileged life

You have great friends and family

Opportunities are everywhere, and you only need to take the first step

You have great aspirations and will accomplish a lot in life

But even if you don’t, it’s okay

I know you are stressed out right now,

and maybe the past few weeks haven’t been the best

but that doesn’t mean your life needs to stay this way for long

Just know that you’ve been through worse and survived

And you’ll be home soon, and everything will be okay

Love you,

Jeff

How to choose a career you want with incentives

There are 5 types of incentives in life (3 according to the book Freakonomics), powered by 5 different types of “minds” in your head.

  • Economical
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Personal
  • Logical

Your economical mind wants you to become an investment banker. He wants you to make as much money as you can and get rich.

Your moral-self wants you to save the world and cure cancer and poverty on the same day. He wants you to help as many people as you can.

Your social mind seeks fame and approval. She wants all the Instagram likes and followers and wants everyone in her friend circle to admire her.

The personal part of your brain is the one that wants you to achieve your personal dreams. She wants you to be the best version of you—meditatesevery dayy, exercises, eats healthy, has a family and children, and owns 5 cute puppies. She wants to make a difference in the world, and she wants to feel good while doing it.

Your logical self is the bastard in the back of your head telling you: “Calm down! Let’s just live a normal, passive life, and not taking any risks.” This logical self is the one that stops you from doing crazy shit—which is good because it keeps you safe. But he also crushes your dreams of wanting to be an NBA player or Broadway actor.

How do you decide what you want to do in life?

First ask yourself: which of those incentives controls most of your decisions?

Is it all 5? Or is it just 1 or 2? Are you most driven by the idea of being rich, or famous, or both? Or do you want to cure cancer?

For example: here is my rough “breakdown” for now

  • Economical (30%)
  • Moral (30%)
  • Social (5%)
  • Personal (30%)
  • Logical (5%)

My idea of a future career is one where I am 1) rich, 2) able to help people, and maybe cure poverty 50% of the way, and 3) be the best version of myself.

Those 3 are my top incentives, with social and logical not really a big factor in my decision making.

Some people have their breakdown look like this:

  • Economical (200%)
  • Moral (-100%)
  • Social (0%)
  • Personal (0%)
  • Logical (0%)

Basically, the Wall Street investors who are willing to exploit others for money.

Thankfully, some people look like this:

  • Economical (0%)
  • Moral (100%)
  • Social (0%)
  • Personal (0%)
  • Logical (0%)

Thank goodness we have people like this. Shoutout to volunteers & philanthropists around the world.

So. What incentives are you driven by?

Then ask yourself, what career can best fulfill the incentives I most value?

For me, I value economical, moral, and personal.

In the future, I plan to be a: Investor, financial advisor, future professor.

Investor to make money and invest in companies I believe in (ethical companies, green companies like solar or renewable energy, and companies that are making a difference). Make loads of money so I can be financially stable and use that stability to help other people achieve the same.

Financial advisor to help low-medium income families who might need a little “push” in the right direction of the financial world.

Future professor, to help inspire and educate the future generation, and also to prove to myself that I can be a valuable person to society.

And then when I am rich, I plan to donate the large sums of my wealth to charity / causes I care about.

Economical, Moral, and Personal—all hit.

But in the end, whatever career you choose, just be happy to choose it, and be happy in life.

Good Luck.

Post is inspired by Tim Urban’s Blog (5 Incentives Tentacles)

People are doing quality work

Today I found out that there is a 19-year-old physics student at Stanford who is discovering ways to locate and avoid space-debris (or space junk), which will benefit companies like NASA and SpaceX and the ISS.

and most of you have heard of the 20-year-old women’s advocate and the youngest Nobel Prize laureate

TED conferences are held around the world, sharing new and innovative ideas. Whether it be about blockchain, or education, or parenting methods, poetry, technology, or how to address world issues like poverty and pollution, or sharing a talent like beatboxing–it’s all exciting to see.

People are doing quality work and it’s very exciting

I am excited for the future because I know there are a lot of people out there working towards making the future better.