Accepted to Cambridge

I am so happy to announce that today I was accepted to Cambridge Pembroke College to study Economics and Philosophy for the Spring 2020 Semester.

I am immensely excited to work with professionals in their fields in a tutoring system where I will get to be intellectually and academically challenged in a unique system that only Oxbridge offers in the world.

And the reason I am writing this on my blog is that I feel like I want to share this happiness with my readers, my family, my friends.

Thank you for anyone who has stayed with me on this journey, either actively or passively.

I appreciate every one of you.

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problems

Don’t bring up problems unless you intend to provide potential solutions, or at least put in the effort to help work towards solutions

we know there are many problems in this world

we see them

we hear it

the media is great at telling us what’s wrong with society

let’s instead be better at saying what is good with it

for one: tater tots are the greatest breakfast dish.

holding myself back

One of life’s biggest questions is relationships

Choosing the right ones

And cutting off the ties you don’t need anymore like split ends

But relationships are difficult because it has to be a two-way street

What you want might not align with what the other person wants

Both people need to put on the effort

They always say the grass is greener on the other side

That may be true, but what’s truer is that the grass is always greener on the side that you water

So it’s important to work on yourself before you look for relationships

Unconditional happiness

Meditation for me is about mindfulness

Mindfulness to strive towards unconditional happiness

Being able to realize that existence alone can equate to happiness

Unconditional of a fancy car, a nice house, a relationship, money, pleasures, status…

Awareness that existence alone, even for a second, can give you happiness

That is the unbounded power of mindfulness

Three C’s

  1. Curiosity to find yourself
  2. Courage to
  3. Choose yourself

No know really knows what they are doing in this life

But that’s no excuse for indecency or mediocrity

You need to have curiosity

Curiosity to find out what makes you happy and why you were put on this earth

then you need the courage to choose to be yourself

because no one else can

only you have that power

 

Philosophy makes you more sad

One of the most popular maxims in the world of philosophy, granted to us by good old Socrates, is that “the unexamined life is not worth living”

Surely, the unexamined life is less interesting. But does it make a person sadder?

To be a true philosopher, you must contemplate life and approach your transcendence.

Simone de Beauvoir, my favorite philosopher, and area of study, explains of the stages of freedom in her book Ethics of Ambiguity.

Now, I won’t go into too much detail about each step of the ladder, as there are 5 steps before we approach “genuine freedom,” which is ultimately how we reach our transcendence. But the important thing about de Beauvoir is that she addresses nihilism.

Nihilism is the third and inevitable step towards transcendent freedom.

Nihilism is an attitude; it is a conclusion that life is meaningless.

Now there is both active nihilism and passive nihilism, the latter of which we want to especially avoid.

Passive nihilism is what I would call modern-day dispassioned depression.

This is a dangerous combination because it is an awareness of one’s own sadness but also paired with a lack of passion or willingness to actually do anything. It’s almost like a complacency with one’s own conclusion that life is meaningless. Quite a sad attitude to carry for the rest of your life.

Eventually, you’ll burn.

Active nihilism, on the other hand, is how we are able to escape the nihilistic attitude entirely and approach the next steps to transcendence (which is called the “adventurer,” a person who does things for the sake of doing)

The active nihilist is in a rather precarious situation (as nihilism, in general, is quite a dangerous rope to cross). The active nihilist is aware of his conclusion that life is meaningless, but he fights against this conclusion—contemplating the notion and challenging his own predicament.

Eventually, the active nihilist, after much (or little) contemplation, will either move on towards his transcendence or revert to a passive nihilism.

I think every philosopher will approach nihilism at some point in their contemplative career, and often many times. Nihilism isn’t something we are able to just escape entirely unless you have approach full and complete transcendence. I know of no such person, except maybe the Buddha.

So yes, philosophers, true philosophers who are dedicated to a life of contemplation, will reach nihilism at some stage in their path to transcendence. Simone de Beauvoir calls transcendence “genuine freedom”; Nietzsche calls it the “Overman”; Plato has the “Good” and “Truth.”

All-in-all, if we want to truly achieve our philosophical potential, it’ll be difficult, it’ll be confusing, and it’ll also have a lot of sadness.

A sadness in nihilism. A sadness in lack of direction. A sadness through too much contemplation. But just know that sadness can be turned into passion and used to approach our transcendence.

Good Luck.

If you’d like to read some Simone de Beauvoir, check out her book Ethics of Ambiguity where she discusses freedom, humanity, and the meaning of life, etc. (She has a special place in my heart; she also essentially founded the second feminist movement).