Do you believe in Karma?

I truly wish karma existed

Then there would just be an overseeing universal power, called “Karma” that would hold every individual accountable for their actions

More accountability and more responsibility put more weight on our words and actions

Then we start to see how important it is to pause and reflect

To think before we act

To stand up for what we believe in, to feel remorse, and to be better versions of ourselves.

Good thing we don’t need “karma” to hold ourselves accountable

patience

The name of the game is patience

If you approach life with patience, everything becomes more liberating

Forget about getting rich overnight

Abs don’t show up after working out once

And knowledge compounds

When you approach life with a perspective of improvement rather than an urgency to beat everyone else in an arbitrary race, you realize how liberating it can be to live life with this patience approach

So it’s okay to take the weekends off once and a while

Enjoy your vacations, take care of yourself, and don’t burn out. Because if you burn out, you won’t be able to race at all.

But remember that you need to continually keep your foot in the race

It’s okay to be the slow on in the race; don’t we all know the story of the tortoise and the hare?

past time

what you do with your past time will determine your lifestyle.

I like to watch Netflix.

But I also try to do things that I enjoy and also will help me grow as a person.

I write. I read. I exercise. I meditate

If you can add productive habits to your life and slot them into your past time and free time slots, you’ll realize that all that time spent on TV could actually translate into a healthier body, healthier mind, developing a new skill, or more time reading a book you like.

Good Luck

 

Advice for college students

Don’t be in a rush

My first advice is this:

if you are in college, you are probably anywhere from the age of 18–22.

Now imagine this. If you are 20, you could do NOTHING right, and fail at everything you try for the next 10 YEARS. And you’d still be young

So don’t be in a rush.

Next, Find the variance.

I dropped my double major in the business school and opted to pick up a Philosophy major in the College of Liberal Arts near the end of my sophomore year.

Actually, it’s not officially declared, but I intend to do so.

My second piece of advice is simple.

Learn broadly.

Take the courses you are interested in and diversify your knowledge.

Those who are innovative are able to take two interrelated disciplines and build something new.

Just like how Lindt Chocolate combines dark chocolate with chili peppers, learn how to differentiate yourself with two different attributes.

Good Luck.

self-contradictions

Our real Instagrams are fake

Our finstas (fake Instagrams) are real… at least more real

We are all self-contradictions

Heroes wearing a thousand masks

Are we meant to reveal our private self?

Our public self?

Our true self?

Does anyone really know who they are?

I think maybe not. Self-identity is constantly expanding. We are constantly changing.

How can we truly know something that is ever-changing?

2 + 2 will always equal 4, given basic math principles.

But the Jeff Wang of yesterday is different from the Jeff Wang of now from the Jeff Wang of 10 seconds ago.

Even as I write this post, I’ve changed, I’ve changed the direction of how I wanted to present this post, this very sentence as I write it. Self-contradictions.

Who am I, truly?

Maybe I don’t know

And maybe the sooner I realize that I don’t know who I am, the sooner I can get towards the path of self-revelation

Life is a Grocery Store

I’ve been having some life dilemmas recently

Regarding my education, career path, vocation, existentialism…

and I talked to a professor at Villanova today who is the head of the Honors department and he gave me this great analogy:

A lot of people think of life as a sprint. But life isn’t a sprint. It’s a marathon.

And then after you realize life is a marathon, you then realize again that life is actually a grocery store.

A lot of people can see the finish line in a marathon. They know where to go. They know that it will take a long time. But the path is predestined. I want this job. I’ll get married at 28. I’ll have kids by 30. Be a millionaire by 35 and retire early at 50. I’ll travel the world, go volunteer, do work for the government, or a bank, or a non-profit.

Life isn’t a sprint. And it’s not a marathon.

Actually, life is more like a grocery store.

There are many aisles. And you are perusing, checking out items, meticulously (and sometimes non-meticulously) putting items into your cart. And sometimes you’ll get random items in your basket and you’ll have no idea how it got there. Maybe a kid put it in. Maybe YOUR kid put it in. Maybe it just fell in from a shelf. All the different items at the grocery store are unique and sometimes your cart will be full of items that you weren’t planning on getting.

Even more so, you might end up at the checkout and decide you didn’t want that pasta or cereal anymore.

Sometimes you’ll be 20 years into your career and realize you want to be a Buddhist monk instead of a banker.

I think the most important thing this professor told me though, was that I should call myself a seeker.

Life isn’t black and white. There is no right or wrong. No simple Yes or No answer to the dilemmas of vocation and purpose that I’ve been having.

Because yes, some of us will be Buddhist monks, and some of us will work for a big bank, and maybe I’ll be the one in the middle ground and be a Buddhist Banker.