Asking the wrong questions

I’ve recently pondered the potential of being a philosopher

But my economic and business brain nevertheless reared its head and started questioning this decision: how can I make a living (particularly a wealthy living) while calling myself a philosopher?

I was pleasantly slapped with the realization that a true philosopher is not so much worried about creating a living, as he is worried about learning how to live.

Oftentimes we ask the wrong questions and we get results we don’t like.

I’ll continue looking to build bridges between economics and humanities.

But at the same stretch, I need to understand that if I want to be an economist as well as a philosopher, I need to ask the right questions if I want to truly solve anything.

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Pressing issues

I’m probably like most people around my age that live on the West Coast in Canada:

Liberal–at least socially.

Scorns at hate crimes and racial bias

Low-key panicking about global warming and the inevitable doom of our environment

Cares about charity and curing poverty

And probably have a few not-to-kind things to say about Trump

But a part of me realizes that I complain too much

The inner economist realizes that the world isn’t as black and white as we’d like it to be. And the world doesn’t care about opinions or complaints; the world cares about facts, data, statistics, and results.

“If morality represents how we would like the world to work, then economics represents how it actually does work.” – Freakonomics

The great thing about studying economics though, particularly if you also study politics and behavioral economics, is that you begin to understand the world a lot better. You begin to grasp the concept of incentives, of society, of the rationality (and irrationality) behind human decisions.

I think it would be a disservice to myself if I didn’t continue my passion for studying economics, as well as the “moral” aspect of the world. Maybe then, in the future, I won’t need to be talking about the pressing issues of the world; instead, I’ll be able to discuss the solutions we can apply to fix those issues.