fighting climate change

Climate change—or let’s be blunt here, global warming—is a difficult topic of discussion not only because no one genuinely understands the ramifications of a warming Earth, but also because there is not one unified blueprint to tackling the problem.

We fight fire with water. We fight obesity with exercising and dieting. We fight lethargy with sleep. We fight boredom with Netflix. But how exactly do we stop global warming?

First off, this is a global issue. When one person is obese, that individual can fight obesity with independent exercising and dieting. But global warming requires the entire world—or at least, a large majority of the population—to come together and tackle the issue. And this is where we have a quagmire because pollution is an externality: 

“For economists, the problem is that polluters are not required to bear the full cost of the pollution they create in terms of the costs to wider society.”

My proposed solution?

Look. I won’t give you one.

Because, let’s be honest, we all know how to reduce our carbon footprint.

And if you legitimately don’t know how to help the environment, then you’re not being creative enough.

Instead, I urge you to think more about what it means to our world if we don’t do anything. And I mean now. And even if it means baby steps towards a better future, at least we are doing something, anything.

Because in a world where everyone wants to take take take, let’s remember that we need to give back to Mother Earth too.

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why studying abroad is so great

I have studied abroad in Singapore (4 months), Shanghai (6 weeks), Hong Kong now (7 weeks), and will be in England next year for 6 months. I am technically studying abroad by attending university in Philadelphia as well, but let’s count that out due to a technicality

There are numerous reasons why studying abroad has been amazing for me

Making new friends, learning new cultures, languages, new food, sightseeing, meeting new friends, and seeing the world

As someone who wants to study both global economics and humanities, it seems obvious to me that I would love traveling and love the idea of seeing the entire world.

I’ve found a new goal for myself and it’s called 30 by 30

30 countries by the time I turn 30

I’ve been to 12, and I have so many more places I want to visit

Condoms

I listened to an interesting podcast today about the many different uses of condoms in Cuba.

That’s right.

Because of how poor the country is and the deficiencies they have in many resources, many savvy Cubans have found alternative uses for condoms to perform other tasks.

Blowing up the condoms with air to ask as a buoy for fishing. Yes. There are floating condoms in the water.

Some people use the lubricant of the condoms to help polish their cars.

The elasticity and durability of the condoms can help repair certain plumbing-type issues.

Condoms are so cheap in Cuba because they are subsidized by the government. Savvy Cubans have thus found numerous ways to take advantage of these rubber products.

But still, when an interviewer asked a male Cuban what his favorite use of the condom is, he still replied: “the original use”

“It has never been so cheap to perform the country’s national sport”