Power of introversion

Modern society has deemed “outgoing” to be a positive trait, while “quiet” seems to be looked down upon.

But in a world where everyone has something to say, a world where everyone just wants to talk, there is an unbounded potential in those who know how to be quiet and listen.

The power of introversion lies in the ability to step back and scan the battleground.

There is power in action; there is equally a power in thought.

So before you start being loud, maybe try being quiet for once, and use the power of thought

 

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One of the biggest self-battles I’ve been having with myself since the start of the new year is the concept of leisure.

How do I have good leisure?

Today I did nothing productive. I slept a lot. I ate some good food. I “relaxed” and played video games.

But my soul was never at peace. And that is what I’ve been learned to accept as leisure: an at-peace of the soul.

Regardless of what the activity I am doing, if I am not at-peace internally, then it cannot and will not be considered “leisure”

Leisure can happen while skydiving or while traveling the world, or it can happen in your dorm room.

But for me, I did not have leisure today.

Instead, I was fighting myself. I was resisting.

I don’t know how I’ll fix this aspect of my life.

I imagine if I don’t figure out a solution soon, then I’ll eventually burn out.

Despite what Elon Musk or Gary Vee might tell you, man was not meant to only work. We must find a way to recharge–even if it’s through other forms of work.

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How do we know anything is real…?

Descartes brings up the question of dreams and reality: how do we know what is truly real?

Do we even know anything?

What if what we perceive as “reality” is simply a dream–and when we supposedly “wake up” from our dreams, we simply wake up into another dream? Inception???

Elon Musk believes we live in a simulation. But I find it ironic that humanity also developed Sims 3. Is that video game just some sort of sick way of the universe designer mocking us?

What about universal power. Who is the designer of this world? Is it the religious orthodox approach of an omni-God? Or is God amoral? Or is he multiple designers? Or was the world simply constructed out of a mix of convenience, chance, and miracle?

I believe reality is real, insofar as we are able to interact with one another. While in a dream, we are unable to conceive the thoughts of other people, nevertheless interact with them. In reality, we are. The fact that I am able to question my own reality, while also conveying that to other people who may have that exact same question, refutes the concept that I am living a dream. Or else we are all somehow living the same dream?

Life could be a simulation. But insofar as we are able to have free will, we are thus not in a simulation. To accept that life is a simulation would have to refute humanity’s ability to have freedom and free will. You can only choose one, and I choose the fact that I have free will.

And what about religion and deities?

I believe that the universe does not have an omnipotent-omniscient-omnibenevolent God in the traditional sense. I believe the designer of our universe is either amoral OR is benevolent but NOT omnipotent. If he were, however, omnipotent & omnibenevolent, then there are too many contradictions. Evil exists in our world, insofar as humanity knows. Thus, God is either not omnibenevolent, because he created evil, OR he is not omnipotent because he does not have the power to remove the evil in this world. And God cannot be comprehended as omniscient because only another omniscient being can say another is all-knowing–knowledge proceeds. I suppose the real question here is how does religion play into all of this, and whether or not this amoral God is worth worshipping?

The only way I know how to live life is as an agnostic in every sense of the word. I must remain skeptical about all of life’s questions, thus, I can remain curious and continue to seek knowledge in this finitely infinite universe.

 

 

People inherently like talking

People inherently like talking

Talking about ourselves is one of the greatest pleasures in life, especially when someone else is genuinely and attentively listening

Here’s the thing: we constantly think about ourselves.

Just no one ever hours our thoughts, because, well, we are “talking” to ourselves.

Thus, inherently, we all enjoy venting out those bottled thoughts

about our hobbies

about what we did last Friday night

about why that new Netflix Series “Sex Education” is so good both as a comedy and as a politically “woke” series

So in a world where everyone wants to talk, it’s important to learn how to listen

Listen carefully

We all have something to say

P.S. if you ever want to hear what I have to say about love, economics, or the concept of beauty, be sure to follow my blog or you can ask me in person. Yes, I do love talking.

Finding beauty in the mundane

In essence, if you breakdown what meditation is, it is simply doing nothing. Yet, I continue to meditate. I’ve been meditating at least 10 minutes for the past two months, some days going up to 30 minutes. And I’m just doing nothing.

And what about the other mundane perfunctory tasks we must complete?

Like doing laundry. Or walking. Commuting. Washing the dishes.

There is a certain art to being able to find beauty in the mundane. I personally enjoy walking. It’s therapeutic for me, especially if the scenery is nice. And even if not, it’s often very relaxing for me to just walk, either with or without a purpose, with or without destination. 

Some people have made a habit to enjoy washing the dishes. Or doing laundry–mundane tasks that need to be done but in actuality don’t really fulfill a deeper purpose in life. It’s just something that needs to be done.

But if it needs to be done, can we somehow find a way to make these tasks more enjoyable? Can we find beauty in them?

If we want to scrutinize these “chores”, these tasks that in themselves don’t really fulfill a purpose so much as the result (ie. we wash dishes to have clean plates, do laundry to have clean clothes), then we have to also scrutinize meditation.

Meditation is literally doing nothing. You aren’t fulfilling any purpose or completing any tasks, per se, during or after meditation. But why has meditation been so good to me? Why do people who meditate and practice mindfulness often lead happier lives?

It’s because people who meditate consistently and thoroughly are also the type of people to find the beauty in the mundane. They are mindful of their existence.

I am here.

I am walking.

I am folding my laundry.

I can breathe.

This is my life and I exist. I am enough.

That’s what meditation has taught me.

And if you struggle with this idea of “doing” things that are entirely mundane to you and feel as if there is no purpose or lack direction, then I present to you a great analogy that my friend brought up in our Human Person class.

Imagine if you were stuck in the Sahara Desert. You can’t see anything in the distance, 360 degrees. What do you do? You have the option to just sit there, OR you can decide to just walk. Walk without direction or purpose, but in hopes of finding refuge, in hopes of finding hope. You’d probably decide to walk.

Sometimes life won’t always give you direction. Sometimes the mundane sucks, but sometimes we can make the mundane beautiful. We can give it purpose. Sometimes, we just need to walk, even if we don’t know where we are going.